What shall I bring on the trip?

gearWe include dirt-bike helmets ,gloves, and goggles, and carry our own toolkit, firstaid kit and parts, so if you don’t have your own motorcycle clothing really all you need is your clothes. However, if you have your own helmet and riding gear, it is recommended that you bring it in order to ensure a good fit.

The sun is hotter than it seems when riding so a long-sleeved T-shirt or biking jersey  is a good idea to avoid sunburn. A pair of biking pants or combat trousers is also recommended as protection from grazes and scratches. We don’t recommend the full body-armour suits as these can get really hot, but on jungle rides a deflector is good for protection against branches etc. A sturdy pair of boots is very important so that you have some good foot protection. For the enduro trails a good pair of biking boots is vital.

 

Recommended Checklist:

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  •  Mosquito repellent and sunscreen
  •  A bum-bag (fanny pack) for small items, camera etc
  •  A pair of flip-flops (thongs) for evenings/around the village
  •  Sturdy footwear/riding boots
  •  Long-sleeved T-shirt/biking jersey and combat/ biking pants
  •  Helmet, gloves, goggles
  •  Bandana, scarf or dust mask to cover your mouth, especially during the dry season
  •  $20 and a passport photo for your visa on arrival
  •  Plastic bags or bag liner for clothes, money etc during the rainy season
  •  Torch
  •  A photocopy of your travel insurance

What currency should I bring?

wallet It is not necessary to bring riel with you; the primary currency is dollars and if you need riel this can be changed easily in the country. Travellers cheques and credit cards can be cashed in Phnom Penh, and most currencies can also be easily exchanged.

Money changers in Phnom Penh usually offer much better rates, without commission, than exchange bureaus overseas so if you are arriving during working hours you may wish to wait and change money when you get here. We can take you to change money the day before your trip if you’d like some help with this. Some larger provincial capitals can also take travellers cheques and credit cards. There are also ATMs in Phnom Penh, Sihanoukville, Battambang and Siem Reap, among others, which accept Cirrus, Maestro and Visa.

When heading into the countryside, it’s best to carry low/medium denomination dollar bills. $50’s and $100’s are easy to change in cities and large towns but less useful in more rural areas. Also be aware that faded or torn large denomination bills may often be refused.

Do I need a license?

Motorbike licensing is a grey area in Cambodia. Practically speaking, the majority of locals do not have a license, however new legislation has been passed and is slowly being enforced. Not having a local license with you is rarely an issue in Cambodia, however it can be an issue for travel insurance companies. Some companies require local licenses, others require home licenses, and others will accept an international license. Please check the fine print of your insurance to make sure of their policy regarding engine size limitations and riding documentation.

Where and what will we be eating?

crabUnless requested, we do not usually include meals in our prices. This way, lunches and dinners remain as flexible as possible, and you won’t be forced to down another plate of rice when what you are really hankering for is a steak and chips!

Nevertheless, your guide will be on hand at all times to help arranging meals, suggesting dishes and making orders. We usually eat at small Khmer restaurants which have reasonable prices and whose menu we’ve tested. There are many excellent Khmer dishes that only the locals know about, and freshly caught fish in most areas. Provincial capitals visited by tourists usually have a number of restaurants selling Western food aswell.

Some of our trips involve staying in small villages with no restaurants. In these cases, we will arrange for a family to prepare a meal for us. When staying in the jungle, we stock up on food in the previous village or town and take it with us.

Where will I be staying?

accommodationWherever possible we provide comfortable ensuite hotels with air conditioning and hot water to allow you to rest well after each day of travel, beit by bicycle, 4×4 or dirtbike . Examples include Veranda Resort or Kep Lodge in Kep, Norden House in Rattanakiri and Khemara in Battambang. Out in remote areas where hotels are unavailable we use clean and friendly local village homes and guesthouses (such as the  homestay to your right). Allternatively, if you’d like to camp out under the stars or have any other special requests just let us know . Wherever needed, mosquito nets will be provided


I don’t see a tour that suits my dates or preferences

We specialise in designing tailor-made tours based on each group’s preferred dates, interests and riding style. Just fill out our custom tour form and we’ll get back to you with our recommendations.

What is the best way to carry my stuff?

medium-sized day pack

Medium-sized day pack

A small to medium-sized day pack is really best for the trip, with a waterproof cover to protect it from dust and mud. If you’re not using a support vehicle your bag will carried with you all the time, so try to keep things as compact and light as you can. You won’t need to bring too many clothes with you-a set of clothes for riding and a few changes for evenings or around town is plenty. Laundry is cheap and quick so you can get your things cleaned along the way (if you’re going to be based around one town for a couple of days). Save a little space for a hammock & mosquito net if you’ll be camping out (we’ll provide those). A 3 litre CamelBak or similar is perfect for staying hydrated on the road and carrying personal items, and most of our riders use these. We are happy to look after any other luggage for you in Phnom Penh free of charge while you are on the road.

When are your tours?

dates

Flexible Dates

We are constantly scheduling both private and join in customised bike trips based on the dates and destinations you require. These tours make up the bulk of our bookings. We operate tours all year round and cater to riders of all abilities; please contact us if you need any advice and we’ll be happy to help you select a trip that suits your ability and requirements.

For an idea of what we’ve got lined up, take a look at the upcoming rides/ join ins on our news blog.

Can I store my suitcase somewhere whilst I am on the tour?

Of course- we are happy to look after the baggage of any clients who require, free of charge. If you are ending your tour in a different city to your starting point, we can also arrange for your luggage to be sent on to meet you.

What if I can’t ride a dirtbike?

busIf you have limited biking experience but would like to learn, we offer a number of training packages from Phnom Penh to help you gain confidence on dirt roads. These can then be combined with one of our more laidback out of town tours so that you can get more hours under your belt and see some more of the country.

If you do not ride, and have no desire to learn, you can choose to follow the bikes in our support vehicle or plan your own 4×4 tour. Some of our routes can also be adapted to allow for pillion passengers. Our His ‘n’ Hers tours are perfect for couples where one half rides and the other does not.

Is it safe?

signThe legacy of the 1970s of course makes off roading in Cambodia a bit different to offroading in other countries, and if you are riding near the Thai border you will most likely see landmine signs and deminers at work.

Mined areas do mean that it’s not possible to  veer off into untouched fields or forests, but not at all that the quality of the biking is compromised! Instead it means that we stick to well established dirt roads, ox cart trails and single tracks which are used by villagers.

ALL routes used by Dancing Roads Dirt Bike Tours are well researched regarding landmines and security, and by knowing the language we also double check with the locals for more recent developments. First-aid and tool kits are carried on all trips and the latest road conditions are checked beforehand to account for seasonal changes and recent road work.

Motorcycling of course entails known and unanticipated risks.  By taking part in a ride, participants accept responsibility for themselves and their own safety as well as the safety of any pillions they have. Riders ride  at their OWN Risk on ALL rides. Insurance (of any sort) is the rider’s responsibility, and no liability or responsibility will be assumed in any way by the organizer/s for the consequences of the conduct of a rider or of any other person. By payment of your tour deposit and/or balance, you expressly accept our terms and conditions and indemnify the organizers and anyone associated with the organizers against any claim (including a claim based in negligence) that may arise from a ride. 

 

Safety is one of the greatest concerns for visitors to the country, and while wartime bandits are no longer an issue some areas still have landmines lurking around. ALL routes used by Dancing Roads Dirt Bike Tours are well researched regarding landmines and security, and by knowing the language we also double check with the locals for more recent developments. First-aid and tool kits are carried on all trips and the latest road conditions are checked beforehand to account for seasonal changes and recent road work.

How much will it cost?

Day Trip Pricing

Group Size Price per person
1 pax $145
2 – 5 pax $120
6+ pax $105

Day trip prices include fuel,bike and guide, as well as soft drinks and lunch

 

Multi-day Pricing Guideline

There is some variation for individual tours,  however the following prices can be used as a guideline per tour day:

 

Group Size Price per person
1 pax $235
2 – 5 pax $185
6+ pax $170

 

 For specific tour package prices, please take a look at our sample tours page

 We also offer Guide Only pricing if you prefer to pay for your accommodation and other expenses as you go

Contact us for details

How do I pay for my trip?

Once you are ready to book, we require a small $150 per person deposit which is payable securely by Paypal. The remaining balance can be paid by bank transfer to our Cambodian account, or in cash on arrival.

Although we do not currently have credit card facilities at our office, there are a number of banks in Phnom Penh which offer cashback. There are also plenty of ATMs around the city.

What are the roads like?

roads_1

Cambodia offers a complete range of riding conditions which will appeal to every kind of rider, whether you’re looking for an adrenalin filled challenge or a laidback cruise. Roads range from pot-holed tarmac to red clay to grassy trails and rocky jungle paths. Here’s a guideline:

  • Tarmac / Pot-holed tarmac / Packed Gravel – The easiest surfaces you’ll come across, but watch out for farm animals and unfinished bridges
  • Red dirt – The most common road type in Cambodia. Surfaces vary, from smooth to rutted and potholed; easier in the dry season but deteriorate every rainy season.
  • Broken tarmac – A tricky surface with loose rocks and sand patches
  • Ox cart tracks – Often very sandy during the dry season, less-so during the monsoon months
  • Rice paddies- Negotiate the dikes and irrigation canals; dry season only
  • roads_2
  • Jungle Trails – The most challenging conditions – ridges, ruts, rocks, sand and clay, sometimes impassable depending on water levels
roads_2

When should I come?

Om_Touk

Peak tourist season in Cambodia falls between late November and January, which is relatively cool by Cambodian standards with temperatures in the mid to high twenties. November attracts visitors for the annual Water Festival in Phnom Penh with its long boat races along the Tonle Sap river. Some bike trails which are impassable during the rainy season also dry out at this time of year.

From March onwards things heat up, reaching above thirty-five degrees around Khmer New Year in mid April. During New Year itself the whole country is in a festive mood, with celebrations in virtually every village. After Khmer New Year is typically when the heat finally pops and the monsoon begins.

Although some routes are flooded during the rainy season, most run all year round. One of the best kept secrets is that rainy season can actually be a very pleasant time to visit, with sunny blue skies, lush green jungle and rice paddies, and fewer tourists..not to mention the cheaper flights! The monsoon storms themselves  are pretty predictable and rarely last longer than an hour or so., so if you’re the kind of person who wants to see a different side to Cambodia and doesn’t mind a bit of mud, it’s definitely a great time to come.


Most visitors to Cambodia tend to come between late November and early June to avoid the rainy season. November to February is relatively cool by Cambodian standards, with temperatures in the twenties. November attracts visitors for the annual Water Festival in Phnom Penh with its long boat races along the Tonle Sap river. Some bike trails which are impassable during the rainy season also dry out at this time of year. From March onwards things heat up, reaching thirty-five degrees or more around Khmer New Year in April. During New Year itself the whole country is in a festive mood, with celebrations in virtually every village.

rainy seasonAlthough a few of our motorcycle tours are unavailable during the rainy season, most run all year round. Rainy season can actually be a pleasant time to visit; there are fewer tourists, the weather remains hot and sunny, and the rice paddies and jungles are at their lushest. Rainy season also means that ‘easy’ dry season dirt roads become a dream for experienced riders with plenty of mud and ruts to play around in! As any guidebook will tell you, showers are pretty predictable, usually confined to a few hours in the afternoon.If you’re the kind of person who’s after some fun and doesn’t mind a bit of mud, it’s definitely a great time to come

What do your prices include?

  •  English speaking guide
  •  Twin accommodation
  •  XR250 or CRF230 and fuel
  •  Specific extras such as boat trips and entrance fees
  •  Gloves/goggles/helmet if required
  •  En route bike maintenance
  •  Full logistical and mechanical assistance throughout the tour
  •  Ferries/road tolls/bridge tolls
  •  Mosquito nets and hammocks where required
  •  Luggage storage during the tour

 

Optional Extras:

  •  Bike upgrades
  •  4×4 support vehicle for luggage, cold drinks etc
  •  Add-on Phnom Penh city tours/ sunset boat cruises

 

Not Included:

  • Meals and drinks
  • Personal expenses
  • Bike damage
  • Visas & flights,
  • Personal travel insurance
  • Emergency transportation

 We also offer Guide Only pricing if you prefer to pay for your accommodation and other expenses as you go

Contact us for details